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Thai company and nominees. How not to be illegal?

But there is more than SEA, and better value as well (at least at the moment).

You can buy landed property (land, house, etc) in Japan in your name as a foreigner, even if you are not resident and just come on tourist visa.

The only 'restricted' properties there are farms and water reserves, but one can overcome even this (lots of Chinese buying these, as a local looking Japanese company).

You can get amazing bargains if you aren't shy to fix places up, even cheaper than Thailand, and you might be able to leave it unlocked for 6 months without any issues - not like SEA.

This one is 3,000,000 JPY, less than $20,000 for the whole house, land and free ocean view.
Fix it up, and you got an amazing place for less than 50K. Still available today.
You can't find stuff like that anywhere else anymore, not for that price and in a quite safe jurisdiction.
Though not really for anyone who wants to save tax, but perfect for living in peace.


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You'd primarily be purchasing the land, as the existing house would need demolition due to severe structural deterioration from earthquakes, making it necessary to build a new one unless you are suicidal . You can spend about upwards from 100 k to build a new house which will be worthless again after 40+ years . Houses in Japan is a really bad investment especially old ones .
 
You'd primarily be purchasing the land, as the existing house would need demolition due to severe structural deterioration from earthquakes, making it necessary to build a new one unless you are suicidal . You can spend about upwards from 100 k to build a new house which will be worthless again after 40+ years . Houses in Japan is a really bad investment especially old ones .
Look carefully, the house on the pictures I posted isn't made of wood.

Though there are still many wooden houses that are 120 years old, that haven't been demolished by earthquakes during that all that time and are still looking fine.

But I know where you come from, houses in JP "aren't supposed to last longer than 40 years" as you mentioned, but the real reason is that otherwise one big part of Japanese economy would suffer. They need someone to sell their shitty overpriced mass produced new houses to, and demolishing and rebuilding every 40 years keeps their children employed.

That earthquake issue is overblown anyway, I lived in a few old houses in Kanto, and all that earthquakes just made the glasses shake, but no damages to the houses. And you can bet some of them were >40 years old and are not up to date to any of that new building codes. The real issue not if your house survives, if the big earthquake comes and Mt.Fuji errupts, even people in Tokyo gonna have huge issues, as logistics would disrupt the food supply and the supermarkets would run out of food in a day (remember toilet paper and masks?). Hungry people are easy to manipulate, and bad things happen quickly, see the last great Kanto earthquake, where Japanese police murdered 6000 Korean and Chinese, after spreading rumors about Koreans poisoning wells.
Kantō Massacre - Wikipedia

Anyway, back to subject: I haven't been talking about new housing. Though it takes a bit of diligence, time to find good deals and paying someone to check the structures, some akiya's are a great bargain, and offer an easy life in a developed Asian country, with first class women as well. Cost wise, food at the supermarket is even cheaper than Thailand now.
 
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