Possible to have 2 residency's at the same time.

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freedomseeker

New member
I have a question... I want to become a non resident of Canada and for example if i was thinking of setting up residency in a low tax jurisdiction like the UAE, after obtaining that (would it take 180 days?) and I severed my ties to Canada would I then be able to also take advantage of the Portugal golden visa as well?

I ask because the UAE only requires one to be there 2 days over a year, and with Portugal it works out to like a week or 2 a year.

In theory would it be possible to be residents of both places at the same time?

Is there a way for each country to know? Is it forbidden?

Is there a way to retain the benefits of the low tax jurisdiction residency of the UAE while at the same time, via owning a house in Portugal, building towards a EU passport?

Can it be structured?
 

JohnnyDoe

Mentor Group Gold
You can obtain as many residence permits as you wish, but you can only have your “center of main interests” in one country. If it can’t be identified (for example, you are a real nomad), then you are deemed to be resident in the country of your citizenship. If you have multiple citizenships, in the one where you were born or, if you renounced, in the one where you have been citizen for the longest.
Note that having many residence permits might result in multiple tax problems: each country can claim that you must pay taxes there. They might be wrong, but you need to prove it in court. So, be careful.

Btw obtaining Portuguese citizenship is not as easy as the sellers of Golden Visa claim. After the 6 years of statutory residence you need to prove solid ties with the country, language proficiency, continuous stay etc. You will not become a citizen just by staying a couple of weeks per year.
 

backpacker

Entrepreneur
you can only have your “center of main interests” in one country. If it can’t be identified (for example, you are a real nomad), then you are deemed to be resident in the country of your citizenship.
This very much depends on the individual situation and the countries involved.
Even though "centre of main interests" can only be in a single jurisdiction, that does not necessarily mean that such a person has a "centre of main interests" in any jurisdiction at all. For instance, a real perpetual traveler does not have a "centre of main interests" with regards to taxation (if he/she did everything right!).

"Centre of main interests" is an OECD-DTA term which (rarely) kicks in when two treaty countries are involved. The higher the number of countries involved, the less relevant this term gets.

Of course, all this is only related to the impossibility of identifying the "centre of interests"!
 
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JohnnyDoe

Mentor Group Gold
This very much depends on the individual situation and the countries involved.
Even though "centre of main interests" can only be in a single jurisdiction, that does not necessarily mean that such a person has a "centre of main interests" in any jurisdiction at all. For instance, a real perpetual traveler does not have a "centre of main interests" with regards to taxation (if he/she did everything right!).

"Centre of main interests" is an OECD-DTA term which (rarely) kicks in when two treaty countries are involved. The higher the number of countries involved, the less relevant this term gets.

Of course, all this is only related to the impossibility of identifying the "centre of interests"!
You should better have one if you are a citizen of a high tax country. Real perpetual travelers are rare. Don’t believe to everything you read on the internet!
 

backpacker

Entrepreneur
You should better have one if you are a citizen of a high tax country. Real perpetual travelers are rare.
That's why I said ->
(if he/she did everything right!).
Perpetual travel (real nomad) is something a person is doing intentionally. All others will automatically be able to proof there "centre of main interests".
Unfortunately, most citizens of high tax countries are so careless that they do not study the details: Even if they leave their priced homeland and indeed establish a new "centre of main interests" in a different country, they may still be taxable in their home country because they forgot to cancel the subscription for local newspapers, are still a member of the local Jodler-club (well, that is more of a Swiss problem), maintain a local insurance or simply forgot to deregister their car.
 

fortunespeculator

Entrepreneur
So if we spend 60 days in cyprus and 183 days in Dubai where will we be considered resident.
Or to put it in a different way if i stay less than the time required for being a resident in 3-4 countries where i have residence then how things will be considered for me from a taxation point of view??( Eg would be my home country being India but i stay less than 4 months there,i stay in phillipines ,i stay in Paraguay,Cyprus and Dubai.)
 

Konstanz

Entrepreneur
So if we spend 60 days in cyprus and 183 days in Dubai where will we be considered resident.
Or to put it in a different way if i stay less than the time required for being a resident in 3-4 countries where i have residence then how things will be considered for me from a taxation point of view??( Eg would be my home country being India but i stay less than 4 months there,i stay in phillipines ,i stay in Paraguay,Cyprus and Dubai.)
You have to have 1 particular country you have as much ties (rent or own house/apartment; hold bank accounts; have registered car/cars; your kid/wife live there; have gym/club/newspaper subscribtion; long term internet/phone contracts etc) as you can. This country would be considered your main residence.
With Dubai you have to live there substantial time there to get tax residence certificate. 183 days would cover that for sure. Or have some other country as your main residence.
Rest time you can visit various of other countries if you wish
 

fortunespeculator

Entrepreneur
You have to have 1 particular country you have as much ties (rent or own house/apartment; hold bank accounts; have registered car/cars; your kid/wife live there; have gym/club/newspaper subscribtion; long term internet/phone contracts etc) as you can. This country would be considered your main residence.
With Dubai you have to live there substantial time there to get tax residence certificate. 183 days would cover that for sure. Or have some other country as your main residence.
Rest time you can visit various of other countries if you wish
Ya now i understood.So basically Cyprus residency is better than Dubai as you can devote more time staying in other countries rather than being tied down in one place for too long.However cyprus residency takes away some of the benefits of having zero tax benefits in Dubai.
 

Konstanz

Entrepreneur
Ya now i understood.So basically Cyprus residency is better than Dubai as you can devote more time staying in other countries rather than being tied down in one place for too long.However cyprus residency takes away some of the benefits of having zero tax benefits in Dubai.
Yes, exactly. There are also other more expensive possibilities like Andorra. You don't have to stay there in theory to remain resident. However, it's expensive to obtain such residencies
 

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