Best countries/places to buy a farmland.

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MiddleEuroAsia

opportunist
Entrepreneur
Ok, I know that's different from the Usual banking/company formation type of talks that's usually posted here, but I've been interested in acquiring farmlands in different parts around the world for a while now, and I would like to know if some members of this forum share the same interests as me and can shine some light on this topic.

Having said that, buying a farmland as a foreigner offshore is not that easy! and some parts of the world are way harder than other (Asia for example, specially east Asians, are very overprotective of their lands).

So, what I'm usually looking for is minimal bureaucracy and the ability to do what I want with my land with minimal governmental interference (but that's not a deal breaker, as I'm used to deal with bureaucratic governments), However, I would like to invest in a country that has a mutual legal framework which covers foreign land ownership from A-Z without any of the BS or red tapes.

I Have my eyes on Uruguay, Georgia and maybe Chile (not sure about Chile yet). I will have to pass on brazil. So what other interesting places that you can go that are foreigner friendly and will let you buy as much acres of farmland as you want.

Thoughts? :)
 

azb1

Entrepreneur
Hassel free Investment option are farmland crowd funding.
Just Google search you find many.

There are another option is below.
They are provide service which you are looking for.



Hope this help
 

JackAlabama

Entrepreneur
Ok, I know that's different from the Usual banking/company formation type of talks that's usually posted here, but I've been interested in acquiring farmlands in different parts around the world for a while now, and I would like to know if some members of this forum share the same interests as me and can shine some light on this topic.

Having said that, buying a farmland as a foreigner offshore is not that easy! and some parts of the world are way harder than other (Asia for example, specially east Asians, are very overprotective of their lands).

So, what I'm usually looking for is minimal bureaucracy and the ability to do what I want with my land with minimal governmental interference (but that's not a deal breaker, as I'm used to deal with bureaucratic governments), However, I would like to invest in a country that has a mutual legal framework which covers foreign land ownership from A-Z without any of the BS or red tapes.

I Have my eyes on Uruguay, Georgia and maybe Chile (not sure about Chile yet). I will have to pass on brazil. So what other interesting places that you can go that are foreigner friendly and will let you buy as much acres of farmland as you want.

Thoughts? :)
Paraguay. It has also an easy residency which is helpful when buying up "very precious local land".
 

backpacker

Entrepreneur
I Have my eyes on Uruguay, Georgia and maybe Chile
No idea about the other two but be careful when it comes to farmland investing in Georgia! Study the experience of South African farmers who had to go through many hoops. Furthermore, the legal system is a disaster (immature and slow) and the propagated "investor-friendly climate" usually ends once Georgia has your money.
For a start, read this (it is actually a series of ten follow up articles) Foreign citizens have 9 days to register their lands in Georgia .
And Prime Minister: “Agricultural lands mustn’t be sold to foreign citizens” which reveals their true thinking.
 

OTR365

Entrepreneur
I believe this is a reaction to being too liberal in the beginning. Very large estates were sold for pittance to foreigners. This kind of thing always leads to a backlash. Bulgaria was a bit smarter by restricting the sale of farmland. Even EU citizens could only buy land after having resided in the country for 5 years. They may have avoided some of the Georgian excesses.
 

Martin Everson

Offshore Retiree
Staff member
Mentor Group Gold
Elite Member
I would be surprised if many countries now sell farmland to non-residents. In some developing countries the locals would not respect your foreign ownership. In rural areas often jungle law applies and you could lose your life trying to fight a claim to land someone has taken over. I would definitely look into rule of law in whichever country you end up looking at above all else.
 

MiddleEuroAsia

opportunist
Entrepreneur
Hassel free Investment option are farmland crowd funding.
Just Google search you find many.

There are another option is below.
They are provide service which you are looking for.



Hope this help
Thank you for the links!. I already know about crowd funding companies and other companies that invest in farmlands, but I was talking about acquiring farmlands directly not through third parties.
Paraguay. It has also an easy residency which is helpful when buying up "very precious local land".
Interesting. what makes it different than the other LATAM countries? specially developed ones like Uruguay and Chile?
No idea about the other two but be careful when it comes to farmland investing in Georgia! Study the experience of South African farmers who had to go through many hoops. Furthermore, the legal system is a disaster (immature and slow) and the propagated "investor-friendly climate" usually ends once Georgia has your money.
For a start, read this (it is actually a series of ten follow up articles) Foreign citizens have 9 days to register their lands in Georgia .
And Prime Minister: “Agricultural lands mustn’t be sold to foreign citizens” which reveals their true thinking.
Thanks for the link man, yeah it seems like Georgia is pushing for it's EU agenda pretty hard. Gone are the days of Mikheil Saakashvili, these were the best days, and these are far gone, just like him :confused:
It seems like the new government wants to kill every thing good they once had, idk, I think Georgia is an interesting place because it's close to the EU but not inside it, but if they are heading towards the EU route, then I would much prefer an actual EU country like Croatia (I believe their lands are one of the cheapest inside the EU) or czechia (which has a great tax system for farmers)
I would be surprised if many countries now sell farmland to non-residents. In some developing countries the locals would not respect your foreign ownership. In rural areas often jungle law applies and you could lose your life trying to fight a claim to land someone has taken over. I would definitely look into rule of law in whichever country you end up looking at above all else.
I agree. That's why I said that I want a country that has a mutual legal framework which covers foreign land ownership from A-Z without any of the BS or red tapes. I mean if I'm being honest, the Usual "western" countries has all of that. The one who takes the cake is the "USA" like it or not, it's one of the easiest countries to buy any type of property whether it's apartments, lands, you name it. Next you have new Zealand where you can also buy lands ( but with certain restrictions), and canada (Depends on the province) plus others, so what I'm trying to say is the west is the Usually the go to place for these type of investments, but I tend to believe that there are untapped opportunities elsewhere and that's what I'm looking for :)
 

azb1

Entrepreneur
Thank you for the links!. I already know about crowd funding companies and other companies that invest in farmlands, but I was talking about acquiring farmlands directly not through third parties.

Interesting. what makes it different than the other LATAM countries? specially developed ones like Uruguay and Chile?

Thanks for the link man, yeah it seems like Georgia is pushing for it's EU agenda pretty hard. Gone are the days of Mikheil Saakashvili, these were the best days, and these are far gone, just like him :confused:
It seems like the new government wants to kill every thing good they once had, idk, I think Georgia is an interesting place because it's close to the EU but not inside it, but if they are heading towards the EU route, then I would much prefer an actual EU country like Croatia (I believe their lands are one of the cheapest inside the EU) or czechia (which has a great tax system for farmers)

I agree. That's why I said that I want a country that has a mutual legal framework which covers foreign land ownership from A-Z without any of the BS or red tapes. I mean if I'm being honest, the Usual "western" countries has all of that. The one who takes the cake is the "USA" like it or not, it's one of the easiest countries to buy any type of property whether it's apartments, lands, you name it. Next you have new Zealand where you can also buy lands ( but with certain restrictions), and canada (Depends on the province) plus others, so what I'm trying to say is the west is the Usually the go to place for these type of investments, but I tend to believe that there are untapped opportunities elsewhere and that's what I'm looking for :)
Sorry for my Bad English.
 

JackAlabama

Entrepreneur
Thank you for the links!. I already know about crowd funding companies and other companies that invest in farmlands, but I was talking about acquiring farmlands directly not through third parties.

Interesting. what makes it different than the other LATAM countries? specially developed ones like Uruguay and Chile?

Thanks for the link man, yeah it seems like Georgia is pushing for it's EU agenda pretty hard. Gone are the days of Mikheil Saakashvili, these were the best days, and these are far gone, just like him :confused:
It seems like the new government wants to kill every thing good they once had, idk, I think Georgia is an interesting place because it's close to the EU but not inside it, but if they are heading towards the EU route, then I would much prefer an actual EU country like Croatia (I believe their lands are one of the cheapest inside the EU) or czechia (which has a great tax system for farmers)

I agree. That's why I said that I want a country that has a mutual legal framework which covers foreign land ownership from A-Z without any of the BS or red tapes. I mean if I'm being honest, the Usual "western" countries has all of that. The one who takes the cake is the "USA" like it or not, it's one of the easiest countries to buy any type of property whether it's apartments, lands, you name it. Next you have new Zealand where you can also buy lands ( but with certain restrictions), and canada (Depends on the province) plus others, so what I'm trying to say is the west is the Usually the go to place for these type of investments, but I tend to believe that there are untapped opportunities elsewhere and that's what I'm looking for :)
Way cheaper and easy residence. Chile just elected a communist and this means no bueno for land grabbing foreigners and gringos.
Uruguay is worth a look indeed, but it is much more complicated and way more expensive to get in and get residency.
In both you can naturalize and then be a local on paper at least and with Uruguay, depending on your spanish and looks maybe a local in practice to some extent.
Paraguay is much more underdeveloped with all what comes with it and it caters and appeals to ultra low income foreigners due to its remoteness. However, I heard very interesting things out of it worth a deeper look.
You can employ guards for your land at low rates as salaries are ultra low and high unemployment.
Right now you can go to Paraguay with relative ease whereas Uruguay seems to be still closed and you need special assistance to get in.
Paraguay is also a tax paradise (maybe one of the cheapest out there) for your offshore wealth, so tipping the toe in there will not affect your overall global business / income / whatnot structures, whereas Uruguay does have (time) exemptions on offshore stuff/income, but it is more complicated to navigate thru its net and they seem to do everything rather by the books compared to (non neighboring) Paraguay, which is much more freestyle.

In general, Id go with where I had the better contacts on the ground in all three instances and in case I'm fob and know no one 'd go to Paraguay, Uruguay, Argentina and then Chile in descending order.
USA is maybe the best to do this and a 100k investment should get the visa sorted. However, it seems a tax roach motel.
I think you can pull it off in both Paraguay und Uruguay as I got the impression from some of your posts. Uruguay is generally also much nicer and it has good coastal areas as well and safety is also higher. Paraguay Spanish also more difficult as they speak Guarani as well whereas Uruguay is very European like and has many e.g. Italian words in it making it potentially much easier start depending where you from ethnically.
 
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369

Entrepreneur
Paraguay,Brazil,Angola,Tanzania,Argentina, (in africa you need to keep an eye on the controlled anti white movement)
 

void

Entrepreneur
Paraguay,Brazil,Angola,Tanzania,Argentina, (in africa you need to keep an eye on the controlled anti white movement)
I don't know about more accessible country than Mexico - you can enter as a tourist, stay up to 180 days, buy land or property the second day just having your passport and cash, easy as that
 

Golden Fleece

Entrepreneur
I would definitely look into rule of law in whichever country you end up looking at above all else.
Martin hit the nail on the head. Rule of law, and treating foreigners as equals, above all else. For example, Paraguay is a great place for farmland but it has no rule of law. Taxation is another big factor. Personally, I like Panama for farmland. It is arguably the most capitalist of all the Latin American nations, it has the Panama Canal as a cash cow which adds financial, social, political stability, unlike many Latin American countries it also has a burgeoning middle class because of that stability, it is a regional banking and financial hub, it provides a tax exemption on the first $350k of farm income, it respects the rule of law and the rights of foreign investors, and it is actively promoting farming to diversify its economy (along with tourism, the canal, banking and finance, and now a giant copper mine on the mostly undeveloped Caribbean coast, which is slated to add about as much revenue as the canal). Panama just added two more bridges over the canal, for a total of four. The growth there is astounding and the ruling elite have a true respect for business and capitalism. My one criticism is how Panama handled the pandemic, although that is now changing. The inland area of the Pacific coast has perfect farm weather, where there is a dry season for half the year and a rainy season for half the year. So water, which is a key to successful farming, is seldom a factor. Buy a farm along a river and water is a complete non-factor.
 
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Golden Fleece

Entrepreneur
To grow what? potatoes?
Exactly. If you want a farm as an investment, you want to avoid food staples (wheat, soybeans, potatoes, etc.) and concentrate on growing high value crops (mango, avocado, lime, lemon, pineapple, etc.) or other high foods things such as nuts. Or you want a large greenhouse that grows more ordinary crops, which maximizes the number of harvests per year by allowing you to grow crops even in the winter, maximizes yield through water optimization (e.g., drip irrigation), and eliminates disease and pests.
 

Martin Everson

Offshore Retiree
Staff member
Mentor Group Gold
Elite Member
Exactly. If you want a farm as an investment, you want to avoid food staples (wheat, soybeans, potatoes, etc.) and concentrate on growing high value crops (mango, avocado, lime, lemon, pineapple, etc.) or other high foods things such as nuts. Or you want a large greenhouse that grows more ordinary crops, which maximizes the number of harvests per year by allowing you to grow crops even in the winter, maximizes yield through water optimization (e.g., drip irrigation), and eliminates disease and pests.

Growing cash crops and understanding crop rotation will make things very difficult for anyone with no farming background :confused:.
 

Golden Fleece

Entrepreneur
Growing cash crops and understanding crop rotation will make things very difficult for anyone with no farming background :confused:.
That is why you hire a trusted, professional farm management company (with a multi-generational history of success growing similar crops in the same region) under a profit-sharing agreement, where both of your financial interests are aligned in a mutual win-win scenario. ;) Obviously, proper due diligence and boots-on-the-ground research is your key to success under such a scheme. Farming as an investment is not a do-it-yourself experiment for novices (versus a farm as a place to live and to feed your own family).
 
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