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Allisgood

Active Member
It seems Ukrainians can just pick any EU country at the moment and get a one year residency there with all the benefits that come with it:


“Ukrainian refugees have the right to temporary protection in any EU country if refugees from Ukraine have been permanent residents of Ukraine and have left the country to escape the war from February 24, 2022.
Temporary protection will last for at least a year, at least until March 4, 2023, but may be extended depending on the situation in Ukraine.”

So just chose one EU country that suits you best and go for it. Other than that, I think you will be most likely restricted to the 1st country you chose. So you won’t easily be able to move to a 2nd EU country, unless you get any EU citizenship along the way. Or some special visa or investment.

Other than that it’s a pretty good deal.
Access to labour market, access to healthcare. Same treatment as an ordinary EU resident.
 

VladDracula

New member
It seems Ukrainians can just pick any EU country at the moment and get a one year residency there with all the benefits that come with it:


“Ukrainian refugees have the right to temporary protection in any EU country if refugees from Ukraine have been permanent residents of Ukraine and have left the country to escape the war from February 24, 2022.
Temporary protection will last for at least a year, at least until March 4, 2023, but may be extended depending on the situation in Ukraine.”

So just chose one EU country that suits you best and go for it. Other than that, I think you will be most likely restricted to the 1st country you chose. So you won’t easily be able to move to a 2nd EU country, unless you get any EU citizenship along the way. Or some special visa or investment.

Other than that it’s a pretty good deal.
Access to labour market, access to healthcare. Same treatment as an ordinary EU resident.

Yes, it's a good solution for a short period of time, however I like to have a plan for 5-10 years ahead. I don't want to find myself in 2 years without a resident permission and again seeking for a way to start everything from scratch.
 

Allisgood

Active Member
Yes, it's a good solution for a short period of time, however I like to have a plan for 5-10 years ahead. I don't want to find myself in 2 years without a resident permission and again seeking for a way to start everything from scratch.
Yes but I am 100% sure that you will be able to stay indefinitely. But only in the 1st EU country you chose. It may not be easy to move again to a 2nd one (as easily as moving to the 1st one).
 

Allisgood

Active Member
Don't say that. You are not 100% sure. There is no certainty in the current situation.
War will last a while. This one year residency will be extended again and once you live there 2-3 years you will be able to convert it into a permanent one.
Just look back at Balkan wars and all the people who moved to the EU back in the 90s. The situation now is similar.
 

bastard

Mentor Group Gold
Guys, what do you think about Romania? Maybe not a perfect country to settle, but micro-company setup will lower the taxes to 1%+5%. Probably can spend few years here.
check out this thread
 

GPT

Active Member
Bikes are cool, but I'm a petrolhead so NL roads and German autobahns will suit my needs, hah.

Never been to Switzerland, Numbeo says it's damn expensive. Also no english I suppose.
Italy looks nice with € 100,000 lump sum tax, with 400k income it will be 25% taxes.
Portugal with NHR program is perfect if one has passive income (I'm not there yet). With active income it's going to be huge taxes.
Ireland seems interesting with low corp tax, however personal tax will be around the same 50%?
English is widely spoken in Switzerland. Especially in the bigger cities and workplace.
 

Mr Gus

Active Member
Bikes are cool, but I'm a petrolhead so NL roads and German autobahns will suit my needs, hah.

Never been to Switzerland, Numbeo says it's damn expensive. Also no english I suppose.
Italy looks nice with € 100,000 lump sum tax, with 400k income it will be 25% taxes.
Portugal with NHR program is perfect if one has passive income (I'm not there yet). With active income it's going to be huge taxes.
Ireland seems interesting with low corp tax, however personal tax will be around the same 50%?
If you are planning to be a high co2 outpout vehicle in the Netherlands be ready to pay a premium because of BPM. Before taking up residency in the Netherlands you could buy that vehicle in Ukraine and if you owned it for more then 6 months you will be able to import it duty and tax free.

In Italy you have the Impatriate regime which offer a 70-90% reduction on your personal income for 5 years depending on where in Italy you locate to, it's a quite unknown program and you should ask yourself if you want to deal with Italy in the first place but it might be worth checking out.

What John said is totally accurate and to make the Netherlands even less interesting for you.. The 400K cap is going back to 200K starting from 2023, they will also increase the dividend tax from 26.9% to 29.5% for dividends over 67000 starting from 2024. Also the cost of living is quite high especially in a city like Amsterdam, so from a financial stand point Switzerland makes a lot more sense which is also high cost of living but less taxes in some cantons. Also from a petrol head point of view Switzerland is way better, cars are cheaper, still close to the autobahn and close to some great mountain roads, but speeding in both countries will cost you a lot of money and you will lose your license very quickly.

Since you said you don't want to live in Cyprus or Malta which I completely understand, indeed Bulgaria or Romania are definitely worth checking out, Andorra maybe as well and of course Dubai.
 

VladDracula

New member
If you are planning to be a high co2 outpout vehicle in the Netherlands be ready to pay a premium because of BPM. Before taking up residency in the Netherlands you could buy that vehicle in Ukraine and if you owned it for more then 6 months you will be able to import it duty and tax free.
That's some nice information, I've got a 2 years old vehicle. But taxes increases even more, oh my.

Italy is good for tourism, but I don't see myself living there full time.

Romania and Dubai are both temporary options. I will definitely check Switzerland, didn't think it has lower taxes then NL.
 

JimBeam

Entrepreneur
Long story short, most of developed EU countries will tax you at a rate of about 50% (give or take), which is in your case about €200k. This leaves you with countries bordering the EU like Romania, Bulgaria, Estonia or the islands like Cyprus or Malta. If you want to stay in Europe Romanian micro-company could be a great fit and if you have some relatives there - great! Ask some questions, get some ideas how things work there and it might work for you.

In Dubai, on the other side, with this kind of money (€200k) you would burn on taxes in Europe - you could easily live a year in a very good apartment or villa and have a maid available 24/7 that will cook for you, do laundry clean up the place, take care of kids (in case you have them), drive a good car (as you're a petrol head and not some 2.0L diesel - we're talking about the real deal here - 6.0L V8) and not worry much about the petrol cost, have a lifestyle that's unimaginable in Netherlands.

And the best part of it: YOU are the one that gets to choose what you want to spend this €200k on while in EU that money is taken from you as taxes and with what's left you still have to pay for the rent and for the car and for the petrol at €2/L - but no maid, no sun 24/7/365, no beach bars and no fun - just work, pay taxes and die! And you could stay in Dubai for 8 months a year and go to Europe during the summer (Jun-Jul-Aug-Sep) if you want to escape the heat.

Would you save some money in Dubai?

Maybe yes - maybe no - depends on you.
But even if you have burned all 200k/year - that would be the money well spent on YOU and you would get something in return for your money.

For me this is a no brainer. Romania (if you can figure it out) or Dubai.
 

johndunham

New member
Long story short, most of developed EU countries will tax you at a rate of about 50% (give or take), which is in your case about €200k. This leaves you with countries bordering the EU like Romania, Bulgaria, Estonia or the islands like Cyprus or Malta. If you want to stay in Europe Romanian micro-company could be a great fit and if you have some relatives there - great! Ask some questions, get some ideas how things work there and it might work for you.

In Dubai, on the other side, with this kind of money (€200k) you would burn on taxes in Europe - you could easily live a year in a very good apartment or villa and have a maid available 24/7 that will cook for you, do laundry clean up the place, take care of kids (in case you have them), drive a good car (as you're a petrol head and not some 2.0L diesel - we're talking about the real deal here - 6.0L V8) and not worry much about the petrol cost, have a lifestyle that's unimaginable in Netherlands.

And the best part of it: YOU are the one that gets to choose what you want to spend this €200k on while in EU that money is taken from you as taxes and with what's left you still have to pay for the rent and for the car and for the petrol at €2/L - but no maid, no sun 24/7/365, no beach bars and no fun - just work, pay taxes and die! And you could stay in Dubai for 8 months a year and go to Europe during the summer (Jun-Jul-Aug-Sep) if you want to escape the heat.

Would you save some money in Dubai?

Maybe yes - maybe no - depends on you.
But even if you have burned all 200k/year - that would be the money well spent on YOU and you would get something in return for your money.

For me this is a no brainer. Romania (if you can figure it out) or Dubai.
I disagree fully.

You'll get more out of that 200K net you are left with in The Netherlands than in Dubai... Purchasing power in the Netherlands is immensely bigger than in Dubai. As an added bonus, you'll get a real country, with real culture and real people. Plus, you'll get stability (something I think OP is looking for) in countries like the Netherlands. Not to mention the full array of products the global market has to offer in mainland Europe.

As much as I like Dubai for it's holiday and tax purposes, let's keep it real here... Dubai is a little petro state for fun, low taxes and money from disputable sources, not a country to build a real life in.



PS: the real comparison should be made between having 400 K untaxed in NL or 400 K untaxed in Dubai. It's just non-sensical to go and live in Dubai with money that was already taxed in Europe lol.
 

VladDracula

New member
I think of Dubai as a base for my company and not myself. Ukraine has CFC rules that allow you to have a company abroad and not pay taxes if the turnover is lower than 2 mil euro. So with a company in Dubai I can live in a country without CFC rules (Thailand for example), or change country every few months. The upside of this setup is that I can try living in a country for awhile before making a big move and residing there. The downside is lack of stability and nomadic lifestyle - in the end I will not have a resident permit, nor a home where I can come if I'm tired of switching countries (besides Dubai itself, where I can spend winter).

Слава Україні!

Hey Vlad, I am in similar position.
Now considering Andorra.
Героям Слава!
Beautiful country, ticks many boxes in my criteries list. From what I heard it may be boring sometimes and English is not common there.
 

Mr Gus

Active Member
To make the Netherlands a bit more interesting for you I forgot to add you could potentially make use of the 30% ruling.

30% Ruling

You can setup a B.V. before you become resident or be employed by a foreign company (can be your own) and take advantage of a 30% reduction on your salary.
Or you can also opt for partial non-resident taxpayer, if you opt for this you will be exempt from the wealth tax also there is no capital gains tax so all assets except for Dutch real estate investments will stay tax free, also dividends from foreign entities are untaxed, however not sure how that will work regarding corporate residency rules if you are the sole or major shareholder, but this could potentially be very low tax setup.

The ruling is valid for 5 years after that you can apply for citizenship if interested.. (you need to learn some basic level of Dutch and you will probably have to give up your current citizenship)

You can also transfer your non-EU drivers license to a Dutch one with this ruling.
 
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