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List of Residencies obtainable without living in the country?

My friend this is really getting ridiculous. Yes you made a mistake but come on, you ran away before even consulting a lawyer.

Go back to bolehland and face the music, that is a much promising approach than trying to find a country that gives you, an unemployed, not very rich, not well-connected, borderline third world citizen a PR or passport for bringing absolutely nothing to the table (not even living there as far as it seems)
 
In Chile you can get a Visa de Residencia Temporaria/visa permanencia without a lot of paperwork and large expenses. I heard that locals are very friendly and can help you with paperwork if you don't want to engage a local lawyer to help you.
You won't get a permanent residence if you don't stay there though. I'm not sure if you need a certificate of good conduct from your country, you should ask google about it (usually embassy websites contain a list of all the documents you have to provide for an immigration visa)
Here is the summary of steps you have to do to move to Chile:
Step 1. You need to get the documents that prove some fixed income in your home country (it can be a rental contract with 3-4 transactions that shows you receive income for renting your property abroad), or documents about receiving money from any freelance market system (I guess with a bank statement as well).
Step 2. Then you come to Chile and apply for a Cedula National Identity Card (ID). (It will give you a right to stay in Chile long term, but not work for a local company in Chile)
Step 3. Once you have a local ID you get access to local public services (Clave Unica) and you should register online as self-employed and open an account in the pension fund AFP.
Step 4. Show (declare) the self-employment income of 1500 USD/month for 6 months (it obliges you to pay taxes + insurance about 150 USD/month). This way you can change your residence permit type (self-employed) to a local work visa/permit (so you can get a job there), as self-employed are allowed to do so. In another year after this transition you can get a permanent residence permit for 5 years and 5 or 6 years later you can apply for citizenship (if you live in the country).

If you need just a local temporary residence permit for some reason, Paraguay is a popular choice. It costs about $3000. However they require a lot of documents with an apostille including certificate of good conduct (if you have a criminal record, they won't approve your request)

You can request a Remote Work Visa in UAE online (total costs about $500 in Dubai). If they like the scanned copies of your documents they approve your visa and you don't have to show them any other documents later. This may work for you if don't need a right to work in the country.
 
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In Chile you can get a Visa de Residencia Temporaria/visa permanencia without a lot of paperwork and large expenses. I heard that locals are very friendly and can help you with paperwork if you don't want to engage a local lawyer to help you.
You won't get a permanent residence if you don't stay there though. I'm not sure if you need a certificate of good conduct from your country, you should ask google about it (usually embassy websites contain a list of all the documents you have to provide for an immigration visa)
Here is the summary of steps you have to do to move to Chile:
Step 1. You need to get the documents that prove some fixed income in your home country (it can be a rental contract with 3-4 transactions that shows you receive income for renting your property abroad), or documents about receiving money from any freelance market system (I guess with a bank statement as well).
Step 2. Then you come to Chile and apply for a Cedula National Identity Card (ID). (It will give you a right to stay in Chile long term, but not work for a local company in Chile)
Step 3. Once you have a local ID you get access to local public services (Clave Unica) and you should register online as self-employed and open an account in the pension fund AFP.
Step 4. Show (declare) the self-employment income of 1500 USD/month for 6 months (it obliges you to pay taxes + insurance about 150 USD/month). This way you can change your residence permit type (self-employed) to a local work visa/permit (so you can get a job there), as self-employed are allowed to do so. In another year after this transition you can get a permanent residence permit for 5 years and 5 or 6 years later you can apply for citizenship (if you live in the country).

If you need just a local temporary residence permit for some reason, Paraguay is a popular choice. It costs about $3000. However they require a lot of documents with an apostille including certificate of good conduct (if you have a criminal record, they won't approve your request)

You can request a Remote Work Visa in UAE online (total costs about $500 in Dubai). If they like the scanned copies of your documents they approve your visa and you don't have to show them any other documents later. This may work for you if don't need a right to work in the country.
what about Panama ?
 
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Can someone make a list of the Best residencies (which ultimately lead to permanent residency) in countries where you only need to spend a few days to a few weeks in order
to sort everything out, OR that can be completed remotely?

I'm aware of Armenia and Mexico.


What other countries apply?
Andorra is perfect for that, if you have EEA passport.
You can look at Passive investment program. You are not required to stay in country to retain residence. If you stay less than 180 days you pay 0% income tax.
It's not blacklisted unlike UAE for example. So less problems having bank accounts
However, Andorra is expensive option

Cheap option - Republic of Palau residence: rns.id - Web 3.0 Digital ID
 
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dumb question maybe... can you point couple of use cases of such a residency one can practically benefit from outside Palau?
You still have to find address for your utility bills etc. Maybe rent something. To be able use it in banks , exchanges etc
Practical use - you have tax free residence
 
Please don't mention the Palau thing when speaking about residencies.

That is just a dumb card like the e-Residency in Estonia. They are just cards. not real residencies
No, unlike Estonia, the Palau residency actually allows you to stay in Palau 180 days on top of what your on arrival visa gives you (which is 90 days for most western passports). The Estonian e-residency gives no residency rights in Estonia at all.
And Palau, unlike Estonia, has a territorial tax system that unlike Latam territorial systems has no ambiguity about effective control and management from Palau - if you live in Palau and manage a company abroad you pay no tax in Palau period.
 
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No, unlike Estonia, the Palau residency actually allows you to stay in Palau 180 days on top of what your on arrival visa gives you (which is 90 days for most western passports). The Estonian e-residency gives no residency rights in Estonia at all.
And Palau, unlike Estonia, has a territorial tax system that unlike Latam territorial systems has no ambiguity about effective control and management from Palau - if you live in Palau and manage a company abroad you pay no tax in Palau period.
I totally agree. Estonian e-residency is nothing more than "electronic signature" device to be able to identify yourself. In fact it has no real connection to "residency".
I would call it simply marketing trick for country to sell more company formations, lawyer services, etc.

Yes, Palau is normal residence. Republic of Palau residence card is in fact residence permit which allow you to stay in Palau full time (180+ days).

That's what I told that person needs to rent something in Palau to be able to get utility bill, rent agreement etc.
 
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Palau ID is also perfect for digital nomads that need some place as their official address.

And just having an actual government ID from a country that have all incentives to treat you well is very useful, in an era with ever increasing state surveillance and control. It's great for all kind of situations where an ID is required, checking into hotels, visiting exhibitions, picking up DHL packages, purchasing alcohol, entering nightclubs, signing up for all kinds of services, at police controls in third world countries, and yes even opening accounts at crypto exchanges (but not all).

I spend a lot of time in West Africa, and there is really no difference between the Palau ID and other IDs. Like a local official will have just as little clue that say Latvia is a country as that Palau is a country - but will accept both, cause he sees that you are obvioulsy a foreigner. Palau ID makes it possible to go out and leave all other IDs at home.
 
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I spend a lot of time in West Africa, and there is really no difference between the Palau ID and other IDs. Palau ID makes it possible to go out and leave all other IDs at home.
that's great but unfortunately in western world literally nobody will believe you're actually living in Palau and will ask for another "real" ID
 
that's great but unfortunately in western world literally nobody will believe you're actually living in Palau and will ask for another "real" ID
i totally agree. Palau is maybe for some low profile person, moving from country to country, trading crypto or doing online marketing.

That is why I gave good alternative of Andorra. But it's not cheap.

There are other options like UAE. But is the same problem. You will have to provide utility bills etc.
 
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Oh well, one may just not go to the western world then. Has little to offer anyway and staying away greatly improves personal safety and finances
oh well, outside Europe I'm just fine with my current passport... the real challenge is to obtain something equally plausible in the eyes of western degenerates
 
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Has anyone successfully used their Palau residency/ID card to open accounts on exchanges/banks/EMIs????
I just sent an inquiry to a Forex Exchange about the Palau ID and they said as long as there is an ID, a mailing address, and a recent utility bill, it would be accepted. The other question (for an attorney) will be can this be accepted as a valid Tax Residency.
 
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